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Official PA daily: Israel uses seductresses to trap world leaders; Queen Esther caused Ahasuerus to kill John the Baptist

Op-ed by Adli Sadeq, regular columnist for Al-Hayat Al-Jadida
     “[During the Six Day War of 1967], Israel, as usual, subdued the US administration, which had wanted it to serve as a cat’s paw in the region and as an outpost of the West, and demanded, at the last moment, the Palestinian West Bank, which was protected by treaties based on barter: no attack on the West Bank in exchange for no opening of the eastern front to the positioning of Arab forces. In the final days, the generals mutinied against their weak prime minister, Levi Eshkol, after getting him trapped by a woman, just as they trapped [former Israeli President] Moshe Katzav for other reasons. They acted capriciously and did nothing, and demanded that they be ordered to conquer the West Bank, in protest against [the idea] that the Sinai Peninsula would be their only reward from the war. At first, Eshkol stubbornly opposed them, then agreed that a delegation of generals go to meet [then US President Lyndon] Johnson, to convince him. After the delegation arrived, Eshkol gave in [to the generals] and sent the US president a telegram that said: ‘The military delegation on its way to meet you represents Israel’s point of view as a whole.’ He dismissed the Labor government, formed a coalition government and brought [Menachem] Begin into the government for the first time. Johnson, who was being treated by another Jewish woman and fell for her advances, gave in. [This woman] was the bewitching Mathilde Krim (i.e., prominent AIDS researcher and married to Arthur Krim who among other things was the advisor of US President Lyndon Johnson), whom the historians of the time liked to compare to Esther, the Jewess from the Bible, who was controlled by Mordechai, and caused the Persian king to lose his mind, pushing him to murder John the Baptist.”
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